Design Thinking for Legal Services

An overview of the design thinking process as presented by Joshua Kubicki.

An overview of the design thinking process as presented by Joshua Kubicki.

Taught by thought-leader Joshua Kubicki, this course prepares the law student to address the competitive landscape of the legal services market faced by the lawyer, both individually and as a member of the legal profession. A historic first in law school history, It fosters actionable skills and knowledge that translate into creative problem solving for business – their own or that of their clients. This class focuses on design thinking and its methodologies that can uniquely and powerfully address the problems/challenges involved in the business of law. An overview of all phases of this methodology will be undertaken, including empathy and creative intelligence, business modeling, and business/service design. Students will also examine many of the methods, tools, and exercises that are key to unlocking business value as achieved through design thinking. This course provides background preparation for operating a legal practice (small or large), a non-lawyer business, aiding clients in achieving business goals, and otherwise becoming a business-enabled lawyer or business leader.  


A sample slide from my presentation and pitch idea.

A sample slide from my presentation and pitch idea.

Entreprenurial Lawyering

The Entreprenurial Lawyering course is designed to help us students understand the economic pressures, technology changes, and globalization factors that face the legal profession in the 21st century.  This course helps students find a professional identity within the legal community.  Major topics covered in the course include: virtual law practice and cloud computing; free and low cost resources and tools to help entrepreneurs and entrepreneurial law students; ethics and licensing requirements within the United States.  The course is designed is give students a wider perspective on how to utilize a Juris Doctorate degree, and how to navigate within these different employment spaces.  In taking the course, students' major assignment for the is to design, create, and pitch a business plan and or product. 


Image provided by Professor Katz at http://www.slideshare.net/Danielkatz/quantitative-methods-for-lawyers-class-25-regression-analysis-part-5

Image provided by Professor Katz at http://www.slideshare.net/Danielkatz/quantitative-methods-for-lawyers-class-25-regression-analysis-part-5

Quantitative Legal Analysis

This is the first of two courses aimed at providing law students with an introduction to various modes of machine learning and quantitative thinking.  After taking this course, students are positioned to be knowledgeable consumers of quantitative information as a practicing attorney.  Major topics covered in the course include: research design, probability and statistics; data distribution; regression analysis; and a brief introduction to quantitative legal prediction.  Part of the course is dedicated to a courtroom simulation that covers the introduction of an expert witness and study demonstrating a statistical test and research problem that sought to test how accurate eyewitnesses are.  Students are asked to prepare briefs deconstructing a statistical case-study into information that is presentable to a typical jury.  In addition, students receive an introduction to the statistical program R and R studio.  


A plot created in class showing an e-mail classification system.

A plot created in class showing an e-mail classification system.

Legal Analytics

This is the second and final course available to students who have taken Quantitative Legal Anylsis in the Reinvent Law curriculum.  Legal Analytics is designed to train students to efficiently manage, collect, explore, analyze, and communicate about data and information to economy clients.  When I took the course, no other course like it had been offered anywhere else in the United States.  The course is designed to deliver the following skills to students: collecting, cleaning, and processing of data, electronic or otherwise; exploring and analyzing data to produce knowledge and insights, which include machine learning (classification, regression, and clustering), natural language processing, and visualization; communicating data and knowledge to clients, colleagues, or courts; and planning and managing an analytic inquiry or project.  The course provides a detailed approach to using R and R studio within a legal context or data sets.  


A sample of one of our readings, which covers alternative fee arrangements.  Image credit to Jim and Matt Hasset at http://www.legalbizdev.com/files/LegalBizDevPricingWhitePaperX.pdf

A sample of one of our readings, which covers alternative fee arrangements.  Image credit to Jim and Matt Hasset at http://www.legalbizdev.com/files/LegalBizDevPricingWhitePaperX.pdf

Litigation: Data, Theory, Process, & Practice

This course focuses on teaching students how to leverage data, theory, and process to obtain better results in litigation practice.  Students learn how decision theory, game theory, and economic analysis come into the decision to litigate, the length of the litigation, and how these decisions effect settlement.  The litigation process is deconstructed beyond the mechanics of procedural rules to allow students to understand how to properly staff matters, complete tasks with efficiency, and demonstrate a marginal return on investment for each task.  Finally, students learn effective means of case assessment, client counseling, settlement negotiations, drafting persuasive pleadings and motions, managing discovery, persuading the fact-finder, managing litigation projects, and developing effective value-added litigation strategies.


A picture I took of the London skyline.  London deregulated its legal services in 2007 to include non-lawyer ownership.

A picture I took of the London skyline.  London deregulated its legal services in 2007 to include non-lawyer ownership.

Lawyer Ethics & Regulation in a Technology Driven World

This course fulfill's the ABA's requirement that law students pass a lawyer ethics course in order to take and prepare for the MPRE; however, this version of the course focuses on the complications faced by ethical rules in a technology-driven world.  The course covers the topics of globalization, legal process outsourcing, unauthorized practice of law claims, and other current events in the legal ethics world.  In addition to becoming familiar with the rules, students are asked as part of the course to draft sample policies for fictional clients and business created in student teams.  This aspect of the course provides hands-on training in navigating the model rules to deliver an actual product.


E-Discovery

An overview of the e-discovery process.  Source available here.  

An overview of the e-discovery process.  Source available here.  

This course teaches students the law, theory, and practice of discovery of electronically stored documents and information.  The class covers the relevant law governing the production of electronic documents, privilege, motions to compel, and protective orders- as well as the applicable professional standards.  Students also gain a theoretical understanding of the dominant computer algorithmic techniques used in e-discovery, which includes search terms and predictive coding, as well as the legal, ethical, and technological problems each presents.  In addition, students are trained in E-Discovery using one or more of the existing software platforms.  The class culminates in an ignite-style presentation covering a select area of the law.